Dreaming in Character

G.L. Jackson


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NaNoWriMo Update

This month has flown by in an absolute tizzy of words. I haven’t done much else, and there’s much more I need to do. This November, so far, I’ve learned the perils and rewards of working without a real outline. I’ve got a sprawling character study! With the no-editing clause in full effect, I have to go through five more days of do-not-touch-the-structure, but then in December I can rip it apart.

Usually when I’m drafting I’m far too close to the characters to see how to pull it apart and rework it, but I woke up this morning with a clear revision path in mind. I’m impressed, and it’s not often I impress myself.

I refuse to boast about word count. I haven’t even got to the end of the novel yet–I’ll just say I’m above the required. But instead of adding more lovely characterization, I’m going to sketch out how to get from here to the end and fill it in loosely. Then I’ll be satisfied.

I only changed the name of the novel once. That’s also impressive. I have written every day, which is good for me during NaNoWriMo, but doesn’t necessarily apply to my everyday life. Eleven months out of the year, I write when I can as often as I can, but don’t generally have the time to sit down and write for three or four solid hours. And you know what? It’s all good.

NaNoWriMo hasn’t been as much a rush to the finish for me as a learning-to-navigate-my-lack-of-outlining-skills experience. But as my mom always said, “As long as you learn from it, it was worth doing.” Now I can’t wait to craft it into something solid.

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Hello, life and everything

Sunrise this morning was bright red under a perfectly flat line of clouds. If it hadn’t been 5-something in the morning, I would’ve taken a picture of it for you.

Oh, my poor neglected blog, I’ve missed you. I’m always of a mind to tell you that if I have nothing to say, it’s better not to try to force a post. Like so many other people I’ve been digging my way out from the dark days of winter. Here in northern California it’s been raining pretty much non-stop, so when the sun finally peeked out a few days ago I was reminded of the time I spent at the beach sand bars as a child. When the tide went out, hermit crabs would emerge from their shells. Timidly at first, because a wave could always come crashing back down on them, but eventually they’d get brave enough to peek out and stay out, and finally to start scuttling around.

That was the Bay area this week. It was like the aftermath of an apocalyptic event: the sun was finally out, and people stepped outside for the first time in a long time, shielding their eyes against the sudden onslaught of beauty pouring down on them.

rainy-street

But I spent a long time living in Oregon, and I know winter sunshine is more of a tease than a reality. We’re getting ready for another week or more of rain now, and I’m holding my breath along with the majority of the country in hoping that dam in Sacramento holds. In other news, okay, thank you for the much-needed water, skies, but you can stop for a while now.

As far as writing goes, I started a challenge to do a personal novel writing month this month. I decided to finish the novel I started during NaNoWriMo. Every day, the writing was a struggle. I hated all the words coming out. No, not all the words, just the way the story was unraveling, so I stepped back and took a break for a few days. I know this goes against the whole “don’t self-edit, don’t second-guess, just write every day” rule that usually works so well during NaNoWriMo, but I decided that in February I ought to play by my own rules.

I’m so glad I took the break, because the introspective navel-gazing made me realize I needed a reset. If I was going to tell this story, I needed a whole new book to tell it instead of tacking it on to the end of the November one. So I pulled up my big-girl panties and decided to scrap 3/4 of the 60,000 words I wrote in November, keep the other 1/4 as a standalone novella, and begin again. Now the writing is fun! Now I’m convinced I’m telling the right story the right way. What a relief. For a while there, I thought I’d forgotten how to enjoy writing.